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Comments

  • PublicStranger

    PublicStranger

    March 10, 2015, 5:48 pm

    Wow, that must be really difficult to deal with. He's sounds like he's very insecure about the subject. How was he brought up, in regards to religion? How do you get by, when he makes comments like that? Do you just have to make yourself not think about what he's said, or are you able to forgive him for it (to whatever degree that's possible)?

    My last boyfriend was very condescending toward me (including about my being an atheist; he was an agnostic at the time, with a real chip on his shoulder about atheists), and I couldn't handle it. It's important to me that I am taken seriously.

    I hope you two can work it out—or that you find someone who embraces you as you are (no matter how much they may disagree with you).

    Reply

  • teetertot

    teetertot

    March 10, 2015, 6:54 am

    a whole lot. i used to make over twice what i make now. used to fly to different offices daily, but always home at the end of the day. very exciting life fresh out of high school, and had saved up $5,500 in stock to use as a down payment for my first house. NOW, I have had a job making $8/hr for 3 weeks after being out of work for a year and a half. I had to move back in with my parents, got kicked out of my parents house for not working, and am actually homeless at the moment...crashing at my boyfriend's parents' house. i lost all of my stocks, then was forced to cash out at the bottom to make car payments. which i'm still 3 months behind. And I have 3 broken teeth that I can't even begin to afford to fix. If it wasn't for my boyfriend it wouldn't even be worth trying. oh, and i'm 26 fuckin years old. Things are still bad...but I'm optimistic for some reason. Can't really get worse.

    Reply

  • ajehals

    ajehals

    March 11, 2015, 5:29 am

    I'm not familiar with the way Medicare works, but I sort of assume that for treatment to be paid for it has to be needed in some clinical sense... That is certainly how it works in the UK, you can get damn near anything you want done (not everything but most things) assuming that you need it done. How fast you receive treatment will obviously depend on how serious it is and what the implications are for you, but still.

    Maybe there is a difference between how it works in the UK and the US in a medical sense.

    The way it seems to work here is that for non emergency care, you go to your doctor who tries to make a diagnosis. If he is able to he will treat you by whatever method he feels is appropriate (or offer you a second opinion). You would also get a prescription for whatever drugs the doctor decides you need, if any.

    If the doctor cannot deal with it immediately or needs to run some tests, he may take blood (or do other tests, depending on how he is equipped) or send you to a local hospital for whatever tests are required. Once the results come back he will get back to you and you essentially move back to the previous step).

    If the doctor cannot diagnose you or treat you he may refer you to a specialist at a local hospital (and if that hospital doesn't have the specialism they may refer you elsewhere or get someone in from another hospital, or potentially another country...). You would get an appointment, turn up and see the relevant person. Again if the specialist is able to he will treat you by whatever method he feels is appropriate (or again offer you a second opinion). Again you would get a prescription for whatever drugs they decide you need, if any.

    In all of that I don't see where treatments and procedures that don't improve our outcomes would possibly come in. Obviously some treatments might be more important (heart surgery etc...) and some less (treating varicose veins...) but all of them would be necessary, just at differing priorities.

    Sorry if I misunderstood something (I keep re-reading your post and feeling like I missed something).

    Reply

  • stumo

    stumo

    March 10, 2015, 7:54 pm

    > If you choose to hold an irrational fear of inanimate objects, that is solely your problem. I would suggest the services of a professional psychologist as a more constructive alternative to attempts at making your fear the problem of your fellow citizens.

    And now we're slowly slipping into the arena of personal insults. I'm not sure why this is such a common factor among those who hold these viewpoints.

    As I stated, the only practical reason for ownership of certain weapons is fear of your fellow citizens. Aside from collectors and target shooters, few people need a personal handgun for any other reason that shooting their fellow citizens because they fear the same being done to them. And you've just labelled my own fear of exactly that as some kind of mental problem, and I don't understand how you are differentiating the two.

    Let's take an extreme example. Suppose that I, on my own property and with my own possessions, build something capable of destroying the planet. Say, for imaginative purposes, a small black hole held in a powerful magnetic field. Would you have a problem with that?

    Supposing that you do not, let us further suppose that I build a trigger device that anyone can use that would turn off the magnetic field. Would that be okay?

    I would assume not. After all, any crazy person could use such a device, and the repercussions would effect everyone. In this case, the inventor's personal freedoms would take a back seat to the freedoms of everyone else, regardless of verbal constructs like the US Constitution. Am I correct?

    Reply

  • johns-appendix

    johns-appendix

    March 10, 2015, 7:51 am

    Even though I could afford to live alone, I still have a roommate... who happened to lose his job in February. He still pays his half using unemployment and whatnot, but can't find another job (with insurance) given his health issues.

    I gave up my ambitions to get-rich-quick on the stock market. Fortunately, I only ever lost $3k.

    I started up a Roth IRA and fully funded it the past two years.

    I didn't buy a new car during cash-for-clunkers, although it would've been nice to get one. My car is 18 years old, but it gets me to work and back in style.

    I started taking time off from work in lieu of raises. They wanted to reward me without actually putting more money in my pockets, so now I force myself to schedule several vacations per year. Without spending too much money, though.

    Reply

  • ironiridis

    ironiridis

    March 10, 2015, 7:44 pm

    On your first point, that does not happen with my version of aircrack-ng.

    On your second point, yes, I recognize I don't need to capture the "entire airspace". However, because of the amount of activity on the channel on which I capture, the driver drops packets. Whether this is because the driver is losing them, or because the RF contention is causing reassembly issues, I don't bother to wonder.

    On your final point, if someone isn't asking for help, generally they're happy without it.

    Reply

  • nocent7

    nocent7

    March 11, 2015, 1:22 am

    Some lads like to ride with only one mirror. Think you're legally supposed to have the left one only. The mirror mount for the left hand mirror is attached to the clutch on the CB. Coincidentally, this is only just after snapping on me recently on the CB. I'm thinking of getting acerbis enduro mirrors which just fit onto the bars to replace...

    If the mirror mount is intact and in good nick there's no problem getting new mirrors. Do a search on ebay for 10mm motorcycle mirrors. You'll get loads of hits for the CB. A lot of sellers from Thailand tend to make nicer ones than the round "mirror company" yokes bike shops sell. Usually a new set of mirrors would be about 25 quid I'd imagine. I paid similar in euro over here but I know the owner of the place I got 'em and he doesn't mind haggling.

    If you're only doing lessons now you'll be getting OSMPSL drilled into your head. Keep it that way until after your restriction is up and you'll do ok on bikes. That said, you should have checked your mirrors were in place before ya started riding ;-)

    Reply

  • Imagist

    Imagist

    March 11, 2015, 4:18 am

    Au contraire, my experience is that type signatures are often the very first thing that gets written. Even in that video that was posted on Proggit the other day, Simon Peyton Jones (one of the leads on the GHC project) said that he starts writing Haskell by writing out the type signatures as a way of designing.

    That said, I'm criticizing Haskell for being verbose in this one specific area, but in general, Haskell is one of the *least* verbose languages I've used. So it isn't a very big criticism.

    Reply

  • evilpoptart

    evilpoptart

    March 11, 2015, 4:36 am

    The problem with that is in order to come up with a theory you have to take a leap of faith and assume something you do not know, which is the very foundation of science is to test what we think. That is where religion and science diverge but you have to have faith in an idea in order to build upon it which means at some point you just have to take the leap and hope for the best. Which is faith. Empiricism but be paired with the ability to extrapolate beyond what we "know" (though i dislike that word) to be true into what we do not. Because at their core, scientists do have faith that we do not know enough to to discount anything.

    Reply

  • Captain_Midnight

    Captain_Midnight

    March 11, 2015, 12:07 am

    They obviously thought that a lot of people *would* care about the state of their technology, which is why they went to the trouble of faking it. They misrepresented the state of their tech, to the point of creating and displaying a theater prop.

    The product is much further away from release than they indicated. They were basically trying to get people to hold off on buying their competitor's product by pretending that their own product was right around the corner.

    Also, it's pretty insulting.

    Reply

  • Mourningblade

    Mourningblade

    March 10, 2015, 9:57 pm

    Profit isn't the problem - it's that we've made the game such that profit is most easily earned by increasing suffering.

    Profit motive works well for vets and dentists - because their profit comes from helping you.

    Insurance companies make profit by denying care.

    Friedman thought that the most good could be done by getting back to directly paying for treatment. He proposed eliminating all taxes on medical spending and for the government to provide universal catastrophic insurance. I think he's right and would definitely support this.

    Reply

  • harlows_monkeys

    harlows_monkeys

    March 10, 2015, 2:24 pm

    No. The patent would be infringed at the point that you ran the code on the interpreter.

    It's very simple. Source code printed in a book, say, for communication to other programmers about how a particular algorithm works *is* protected speech under the First Amendment. It is very unlikely that this can infringe a patent, especially when you consider that one of the purposes of the patent system is to promote dissemination of knowledge about inventions.

    To infringe a patent, it is highly likely that you actually have to *use* the source code on a computer.

    If you can show me any software patent lawsuit where the alleged infringement was for the source code in a form not readily executable, I'm ready, willing, and eager to stand corrected.

    Reply

  • rooktakesqueen

    rooktakesqueen

    March 10, 2015, 3:56 pm

    Because by asking the questions "can you actually *MAKE* something? Can you operate a lathe? A drill press? Make a chair or table on your own?"--you're insinuating that these pursuits *ought* to be important to each and every one of us, and we're missing something if we don't know how to do these things and also don't care to learn.

    Can you design a bridge? Write code? Discover new pharmaceuticals? Presumably you can do at most one of these things if any. But you aren't going to see some engineer coming on insinuating that you're fundamentally *missing* some skill that you *ought* to have because you can't tell a suspension bridge from a cantilever.

    Reply

  • oconostota

    oconostota

    March 11, 2015, 12:47 am

    I would prefer that this not happen. Especially not right away. I would prefer that people form militias and then tax resist. The idea being that the feds would send in federal marhalls who will work with local police to harass tax evaders.

    But if the tax evaders are the local militia and a lot of the local cops are in the local militia too and not paying taxes anymore then the marshalls and normal non-military federal forces will be outmatched.

    By the time they are ready to deploy real actual military units it will be to late. They(the feds) will be broke and a lot of the military would be at least sympathetic to the cause of the tax rebels.

    Any way you cut it this nation has some hard choices ahead. Civil war is on the horizon and neither of the factions that will fight it are really based squarely in what is best for the actual citizens and people. They are based in a hunger for power and greed. They must be brought low before their arrogance ruins us all.

    Reply

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