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Comments

  • cemasoniv

    cemasoniv

    March 11, 2015, 1:06 am

    The flaw with your ideal is that you think the system has to be zero-sum. It doesn't.

    The point I'm trying to make is that the customers decide if their practice of fines is sustainable. As long as people continue to bank with them, it is.

    And don't give me honky about changing the name of the bank, that's a cop-out. As long as people remain uneducated on finance and don't know how to speak with their dollars then this shit will persist.

    Or, you could go crying to the government.

    EDIT: Forgot to mention that just because they have a net-positive on their fraud-fees that doesn't mean nothing else matters (like how Theory applies in theory but rarely in application). In other words, removing your money from the bank eliminates regular deposits which are the single most important reason to keep a customer (unless you're a lender, in which case the loans are equally important). If those fees are causing the bank to lose members you can bet your ass they'll reconsider the fees.

    Reply

  • tommy-linux

    tommy-linux

    March 10, 2015, 12:36 pm

    I actually saw this woman at Airventure 2009 this summer. I was with a couple of friends and there was quite a large crowd around her and her airplane and she was facing away from us, in the middle of a crowd and we were standing just outside the crowd and facing away from the crowd as well. She was also using a microphone so we could hear her quite well but I couldn't see her. After a few minutes listening to her talk about doing and learning some rather mundane things my curiosity got the better of me and I had to go see what all the fuss was about. Quite an amazing story. She also has a great sense of humor. I think when she talked about parallel parking her car she joked to the guy giving her her driving test that she didn't have any "hands on" experience.

    Reply

  • AngMoKio

    AngMoKio

    March 10, 2015, 7:01 pm

    I don't find it an invalid question.

    The social contract can be in place outside of the government. The norms in a community or society can be such that people take care of each other without direct intervention.

    My background is that I am sailing around the world and I have actually live the anarchists dream - I have lived in small communities with zero government on deserted islands where all commerce is bartering and the community is improved through the fruits of hard work - without government.

    That being said, I am very close to admitting that I was absolutely wrong about government. When government is both by and for the people it is a necessary and functional invention.

    Reply

  • eidetic

    eidetic

    March 10, 2015, 9:49 pm

    Hey, thanks man! Though I am kind of disappointed in myself that I didn't actually finish those cars and do more with them, but they were as I said, for fun, and the red one in particular, was a learning exercise as I was learning Maya. I think part of it is that I used to model cars (F1 and other race cars and road cars) for fun on my own time, but then when I started doing them for work, it sort of took some of the fun out of it. Now, don't get me wrong, I still love what I do, but when I do something for work, I tend to want to work on other stuff on my own time.

    It is kind of fun though, to look at those two really old images I posted, and then compare them to the more recent stuff, even if they were unfinished learning exercises, to see how far I've come.

    As for an old McLaren livery, do you have one in particular in mind? Are you thinking something more "recent" like the Marlboro era livery (mid to late 80's to mid 90s), or even further back such as the orange liveried cars of the late 60's and 70's? Or even the white and green of the (I think) M2B? I rather liked the white with the green stripe, and have that on my short list of potential liveries. Also, Lotus green and yellow would be fun. As I mentioned, I'll probably do a few, but I'm not sure yet.

    I may also make either the model itself available, or more likely just post the UV maps (basically templates for painting on the livery) so others could make their own fantasy livery, and I could render it for them. For those not familiar with 3D stuffs, you can think of the UV map as sort of a template like when you create a skin for an application.

    One recent livery I've had in mind is the orange and black testing ones they used back in 2006 and I believe 2007. I thought those looked awesome, and much better than the silver/pewter/chrome/whatever (they have a specific name for it that escapes me at the moment) cars with the black and red trim.

    Reply

  • sctilley

    sctilley

    March 11, 2015, 9:16 am

    I worked as a canvasser for a non-profit as well. What my fellow redditers are saying is true. There are quotes and money donated though the internet bypasses local offices, but that is nothing compared for the real reason that you, as a canvasser, should not let anyone donate via the web.

    Simply put they won't. The return rate for "Ok I will donate, give me the URL and I will donate there" is like less then 1%. Most people who say this are outright lying to you, and the one's that aren't will forget or be less dedicated after you leave.

    So the point is, while it could be a scam, this is not a sign of it because almost all charities (scam or not) will exhibit this behavior.

    Reply

  • RobotBuddha

    RobotBuddha

    March 10, 2015, 1:31 pm

    Can't afford medical treatment and am in constant horrible pain.

    Used to be the richest person in my social circle, now I'm the poorest. Also went from being the most cheerful to borderline suicidal.

    I was also homeless for a short while when I made enough to buy food but not enough to afford to live anywhere. That was actually surprisingly fun though. It wouldn't have been in a worse climate or probably anywhere other than the tourist town it occured in. "Oh no, I'll have to work out of a beautiful park that has free electricity and wifi"

    Reply

  • KoNP

    KoNP

    March 11, 2015, 1:51 am

    Children die all the time. This one is no different. LOL at all you "compassionate" folk attaching undue emotion to it because there was a photo and a "heartwarming tale" of a sunflower that... fell over? Fuck, I don't even know. Whatever.

    Oh and for the record? I'm not trolling, and I'm not pretending to be "hardass" for internet points. That story didn't affect me in the slightest. I actually feel a little ripped off, I clicked the link expecting it to be a sad tale about a family pet in tragic circumstances and instead I get... that. Yeah, thanks.

    Reply

  • shadowofpersephone

    shadowofpersephone

    March 10, 2015, 8:37 pm

    I have had this feeling before myself.

    I was just wondering if when you get these "urges" if you can actually mentally see yourself carrying out these urges (like when you mention wanting to hit your friend with a huge log, do you see in your head what would happen if you did, hear the crunching of their skull as the log made contact, feel it crushing under it, feel/smell the blood). Personally I think that these thoughts are normal (but that's probably because I've always had them and to me it is) and that so long as you know you would never act on these urges then you should be ok.

    And I also get the numbness, but my numbness is more because I suffer from depression (dysthimia actually, which is a longer lasting depression that isn't usually as severe) and I'll have periods where I'm just constantly depressed, and just the feeling of being depressed becomes so commonplace that I feel like I have no other emotional capabilities and I feel numb, and then I feel as though I need to feel *something*, **ANYTHING** and then I tend to hurt myself by cutting. I do *NOT* urge you to do this, and if you do end up hurting yourself, please seek professional help.

    Reply

  • SteveD88

    SteveD88

    March 10, 2015, 6:50 am

    I see why you might be defensive, but what I had in mind was more of a challenge then a trick.

    Here is what I have in mind. I'll present you with something within human experience (not religion or belief) and you have to prove to me, through either rationalism or empiricism, that it does or does not exist.

    If you can, I'll concede this disagreement to you (a good debater knows when to quit with grace, after all. :P)

    If you can't, then I'll have your agreement that there are things within human existence that can't be validly assessed or critiqued with empiricism and rationalism.

    Are you game?

    (of course, if you refuse then I have more or less made my point anyway :P)

    Edit: Of course I'm not going to give you something easy, but if you think I'm being unfair then feel free to withdraw and argue with me afterwards.

    Reply

  • errant123

    errant123

    March 10, 2015, 11:09 am

    Ok, here's my approach. First we write down the set of possible outcomes. There is an outcome for each integer greater than 0: the number of cards you have to pick until you get the one you want. Clearly, the set of possible outcomes is infinite.

    To each outcome assign a probability. The probability of getting an ace on the first pick is 1/N. The probability of getting an ace on the second (and hence not on the first) is (1/N)*(N-1)/N = (N-1)/N^2. The probability of getting an ace on the third try is (N-1)^2/N^3. And so on.

    The probabilities sum to 1. You can easily prove this by doing the (infinite) sum.

    Now, we can use the definition of average. <N> = SUM_OVER_I(P_i * i). Here P_i is the probability of getting an ace in i tries. This is an infinite sum and evaluates to N.

    EDIT: Oops, off by one. It's N. Did the sum by hand and left out a 1.

    The key is writing down the set of possible outcomes and then assigning a probability to each outcome.

    Reply

  • miked4o7

    miked4o7

    March 11, 2015, 12:51 am

    The problem isn't so much with the profit margins themselves... there are lots of industries that make more than 10% like health insurance does. The problem is how they spend the money they do spend. Right now, 10% of your money goes to profits, but almost another 20% sometimes will go to administrative costs... and those administrative costs are the costs associated with doing things that give you less care. It costs money for insurance companies to figure out exactly how to structure their premiums so that sick people don't take them, to deny claims from those that do get sick, etc.

    Reply

  • stevebakh

    stevebakh

    March 10, 2015, 11:05 pm

    Note, I *did* state that you should take my usage of the word "fact" with a pinch of salt. My post is my own opinion.

    As for drupal being enterprise-level? From what I've heard, any work involving drupal being used for enterprise level work has required massive overhaul and patching of the core. Sometimes the patches are submitted and given back to the community (I believe Sony is the company I'm referring to).

    Oh, and just because you may have seen some proprietary or closed, custom CMS's doesn't instantly promote Drupal to enterprise level. It simply means you've seen some terrible CMS's. /shrugs

    Reply

  • eidetic

    eidetic

    March 10, 2015, 9:44 pm

    I appreciate the help, though I already have the site bookmarked. I've also got all the media images from the car launches for the past years stocked up, but I haven't made my way completely through the other pics. Just to clarify though, more specifically, I'm looking for any kind of detail shots (preferably hi-res). Especially shots that show the interior mechanical parts of the car. And finally, any drawings that are isometric (that is, they lack depth. So more like "blueprint" style drawings or whatever.)

    I do appreciate you taking the time to post though, and taking a look at the thread.

    Reply

  • oconostota

    oconostota

    March 11, 2015, 12:22 am

    Absolutely, but for us to come down from this position is going to be nasty for us. It's not about just less affluence. The american psyche cannot tolerate the idea that we are not the chosen people. The reason is that is how we justify our exalted place on earth now. We firmly believe we are the chosen ones. That we are half-freakin-holy and so entitled to all that we possess.

    Out of the psychological realm look at it this way. We sacrificed a lot our "ancient" liberties and rights to possess this global empire. Now we're going to lose it and not get any of our rights back? We're going to lose our empire and face even more oppression with poverty on top of it?

    Oh no.. I doubt we will even hang onto world power status when it's all said and done.

    Reply

  • zygoust

    zygoust

    March 11, 2015, 2:39 am

    Being on a hike in the countryside, and seeing a half naked human being chained like a dog being led on all fours by another human.

    At first I could not believe my eyes and felt certain it must be an animal, until the chained person tilted his head and looked me in the eye.

    NOTE: True story -

    I live in a country with large uneducated rural populations suffering from a lack of social services. I imagine this person must have had a mental condition and was being 'taken care' of by his handler.

    Reply

  • NJTrustee

    NJTrustee

    March 10, 2015, 12:58 pm

    I am a Trustee (think "on board of directors") of a small K-8 charter school in northwest NJ. Ours is a public school, but being a charter school, we've organized the curricula around ecology, sustainable living, and "systems thinking"...that is, helping the kids to be aware of the inter-relatedness of things. For instance, our curricula is based largely on projects that combine topics usually partitioned at other schools. In the real world, math, history, art, music, reading, writing, etc. are all in constant interplay - so we work very hard to teach them that way as well.

    We also try to reinvigorate the concept of "community" for them, and for ourselves. In our classrooms and in all our management we effort to hear all voices, and decide matters via consensus, whenever possible and logistically practical. I was drawn to the school myself, largely, by this aspect. It's one of the few places I've found (outside of local churches) working to increase community bonds, and a sense of belonging and relatedness among its members. It's a pretty rare thing these days.

    As you can imagine, a school like this has attracted primarily young, idealistic, and really remarkably talented teachers and staff. These folks are committed down to their bones. They live and breathe these principles, and are teaching our kids (mine too) amazing things. My seven year old recently identified a hawk in our backyard, and when we discovered it was injured he tossed off the name of the local hawk-rescue organization...

    Our problem is money. Teacher salaries are miserable in general, and ours are no better. I'd love to give them all a full and respectable health insurance plan. For all they're doing, I want them to be able to put simple *solvency* behind them as a concern. I don't hope to make them wealthy - just financially acknowledged.

    Our school's founders also set up a non-profit organization that promotes the same principles, but also drives some of the school's fund-raising. A donation to that organization will translate immediately into a donation to the school.

    Any help you can give would be incredibly appreciated.

    Reply

  • yello

    yello

    March 11, 2015, 9:25 am

    There is this "bad" practice among doctors in India (well, at least in Bombay). Almost all of them prescribe (broad-spectrum) antibiotics very early in the course of treatment.. (I guess the correct procedure is to perform some sensitivity test to determine which bacteria is causing the infection and which antibiotic works best)

    Several of my close friends (and my father and his close friends) are doctors, and I always point out this "bad practice" to them..

    I wonder if it was my niece or nephew with that bacterial infection, would I still protest the doctors prescribing strong antibiotics..

    Reply

  • blackblocanarchist

    blackblocanarchist

    March 11, 2015, 2:45 am

    Over the years, I've seen it change, especially as the Black Bloc tactic variously rose in popularity or was declared dead at several points.

    The majority are youth, between the ages of 16 to 25, who are motivated by what they feel is a failure of electoral politics, the party system, voting and traditional protesting. Mostly, this does not get into major ideological or philosophical motivations. This might be the person who at a past protest spent hours marching in a circle with some other group, felt the whole thing failed but was proudly told it was a great victory by protest organizers. Or, they voted for Nader/McKinney/Obama and are pissed that they wasted their vote on a loser or on someone who turned around and broke their promises anyway.

    Mainstream protest groups have a big credibility problem with this: they could go to protest, get crammed into a protest pen, get completely ignored while whatever leaders at whatever summit go about their business with the status quo, but then they tell everyone it was a victory just to show up. So a group that openly says it will ignore protest pens, that rejects the need for permits from the police, and is not represented by some old-line peacenik bureaucracy is very appealing. They see it as a more direct and therefore effective protest action that gets attention and ramps up pressure.

    Again, I say this is a majority, maybe 2/3, and the motivation only covers why they initially took part. It is largely due to seeing some mind-blowing event or instance of what they consider hypocrisy, and the official response to it. It is largely due to outside events that these people are motivated. The WTO protests in Seattle in 1999 was one event, another was 9/11, the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the election in 2004, 2008, and so on all drove people to certain conclusions about how the world is really being run and how they should respond.

    For others, it is a question of how they got plugged in. If your friends are forming an anarchist affinity group to go to a demo, the motivation is social inclusion. Affinity groups are usually formed by people who not only protest together, but also hang out together, work or go to school together, go to shows together and often live together. It is primarily a matter of social networks. Ad hoc affinity groups where no one knows each other are rare.

    A small number of Black Bloc participants who come from the punk rock scene have said, as one put it to me, "it's all about bitches and punk points." These are usually outliers and don't stick around long once it's no longer a punk rock vacation.

    For participants who are working class, that is to say support themselves by working some low-paying job or other and do not come from rich families, it's an anonymous way to payback the powers that be. You may or may not be surprised by how many Starbucks' baristas have dreamed of smashing a Starbucks' window.

    For participants from better off social backgrounds, including college students, it's a rejection of a lot of the things they were brought up with. Crimethinc. was very popular among these types, and they may view it as a counter-culture.

    As for how people react within each Black Bloc or why they continue to participate, it depends. Back in 1999, the idea was to do as much damage monetarily to corporations because they don't care about people, only their bottom line. In 2000, it changed a bit and more people became interested in seeing how the tactic could be used to make other protesters more effective. The whole idea of color-coded protest zones came out of this - green for permitted non-arrest situations, yellow for civil disobedience, red for direct action and other more confrontational tactics. There was a lot of behind the scenes co-operation at times between liberal groups and anarchists, if only to prevent any kind of collisions in the streets.

    One misconstrued motivation is the confrontational aspect. Usually, Black Blocs have a certain objective, which the police usually get in the way of. The motivation of most is not to pick a fight with police, or escalate a situation which results in police clobbering bystanders and thereby "radicalizing" them.

    Some folks have used the example of police going after passive or permitted demonstrations while the anarchists seem to run amuck as proof that Black Blocs are government sponsored. That would work, except that these groups don't agree to permits anyway. Also, the numbers usually suggest a few hundred in a Black Bloc and thousands using other tactics: would you devote police resources to play cat and mouse with a few hundred who might lead you on a wild goose chase throughout a city, or to controlling a crowd of thousands? That, and evidence beyond footage of a single undercover pair doing something is rarely offered; it's logic based on supposition and personal agendas or pet conspiracy theories from people who don't actually know any Black Bloc'ers.

    But recently, I think the tactic has not had a lot of strategic thought and motivations reflect that. Shutting down a meeting by marching towards a line of riot cops? Breaking windows that are already written off as about to be broken anyway? But people still do it, as Pittsburgh showed (I was not part of that Bloc btw). There is a lot of desperation in this, because traditional protesting with large marches and rallies with speeches has largely failed, in their opinion.

    Guaranteed, the same people who took to the streets in 1999 are not the same people who took to the streets in 2009. The turn around in participation for active participants is more like 3 years, with maybe 3 Black Blocs. There are perhaps 10,000 to 30,000 people in the United States in total who have ever participated in at least one Black Bloc in the past ten years. Of that, perhaps 5,000 have ever participated in at least six, which might cover a span of 2 to 3 years of protests. These are based on my own guesstimates of size at various protests over the years and turn around based on who I recognize at the next big one - in 2007 in January in DC after a year long personal lull, I recognized 2 people out of 500 that I had been in a Black Bloc with before. (And yes, you get to recognize people with their bandannas on, and rarely with them off).

    I would say that 65% of people in any given Black Bloc would otherwise vote or participate in the electoral process if they didn't think it was so full of shit. Another 15% genuinely see Black Bloc tactics as a precursor to social insurrection and anarchist revolution, and see it is a radical example of how to resist corporate tyranny et al. 5% don't care what other people think and aren't trying to convert other people, but just want to damage either the reputation or property of police/corporations. 5% are just pissed off at everything in society and don't give much thought to politics, with the remaining 10% being a mix of the curious, onlookers who got swept up in the moment, journalists, sympathetic but non-participating lefties, and undercover police assigned to follow or infiltrate it.

    Reply

  • TheGesus

    TheGesus

    March 11, 2015, 4:14 am

    Yes...although fans can refer to themselves as "us" (or "we").

    As long as it's: "We (the fans) want to face the Twins in the playoffs!" and not: "We (the team) need to guard against Ichiro stealing second," then I can understand that. Unambiguous use of "We (the team)" is irritating, though.

    It's like hearing a 30-year-old American tell a Frenchman, "If it wasn't for *us,* you'd be speaking **German!**" Really, tough guy? What was it like to land at Omaha beach? Got any stories from the Battle of the Bulge? (Disclosure for my picking this example: I had an uncle land at Normandy and get taken prisoner (eating "nothing but cabbage" for months) -- vets do not appreciate this self-interested inter-generational lumping. Whenever I see this, I think of a nine-year-old walking into a VFW and bitching to compatriots about Da Nang.)

    Actually, I realized I'm comparing sports to war. The second example is even tackier and more ridiculous.

    Reply

  • waddupeverybody

    waddupeverybody

    March 10, 2015, 8:40 am

    It should be noted that my bankroll is constantly fluctuating, thus I'm constantly recalculating my betting structure according the the "Kelly Criteria" mentioned below.

    My biggest downswing was when I lost just under 50% of my bankroll. It was hard to take emotionally. I figured that, statistically, I had about a 1 in 150 chance of that happening. But I just trusted in the math and was back up in no time.

    My common sessions will be in the several thousand range (up or down). I currently cut off my sessions at a 4000 win or loss. Cutting off at a win is to avoid unwanted attention and cutting off at a loss is for emotional reasons. You can't be frustrated and play or you will make errors.

    My "risk of ruin" is essentially zero because I use the "kelly criterion". It's complicated, but basically I constantly resize my bets according to my bankroll. If I have a big loss, the next session I bet less. That make sense?

    EDIT: Sorry missed your second question. I dont use advanced techniques because I am just simply not good enough at them. It takes a different breed of a person to be an "ace locator" or a "shuffle tracker." Though I did play for a while with some shuffle trackers and let me tell you, their skills were incredible. The amount of data they would remember was unbelievable. I just can't do that.

    Reply

  • bluecalx2

    bluecalx2

    March 10, 2015, 8:01 pm

    I'm fortunate enough to have a steady job, but because all of our clients are losing money, it affects us. So I put together some paperwork for clients and my company receives payment. Our clients are trying to find any possible excuse not to pay us, mostly things that would have never been an issue a year ago. "We need clarification on this contract. Please rewrite it." "We're using this new template for all our logs, so we'll need to do this over." And my favorite, "Your invoice didn't have your company logo on it, so we can't pay you." This means twice as much work for me, including some late nights, with no overtime and no raise this year.

    On the positive side, my landlord decided not to raise the rent this year. So financially, I'm in the same position I've been in, just with a lot more work and stress.

    Reply

  • Altairassassin

    Altairassassin

    March 10, 2015, 9:15 pm

    I have killed people who were not nessary to kill, and rather than stay hidden in plane sight, I would walk right out and try to kill people. This resulted in one assassin dying, and one more losing his arm. I was stripped of my rank and had to redeem my self. I killed 9 men, in an organization or cult of some sort called the Templars, and they wanted to use something that would control everyone to make peace. It turns out, our leader was also part of the plot, and I had to kill him too. I then went to the the island of Cyprus to kill off the rest of the Templars.

    Reply

  • monroetransfer

    monroetransfer

    March 10, 2015, 3:12 pm

    Nobody chooses to be handicapped, black, female, or gay. It's wrong to criticize these traits since no human is responsible for them.

    If however a human being who had complete potential to exercise their rational faculty has instead given in and willfully deluded themselves with a comforting fairy tale which has the potential to make them arrogant, disdainful, judgemental, or violent, then I see no problem in criticizing that person. That is an awful choice to make, and I have so little respect for people who do that. At best it's a sort of pity. Some people I suppose are too terrified to face the real world.

    Reply

  • jorisb

    jorisb

    March 11, 2015, 6:24 am

    Deeply? Give me a break. It was a small cut percentage wise. How about some responsible spending for a change? Or how about spending it on R&D where Canada is severely lacking right now.

    And don't you ever get tired of comparing Conservatives to American republicans? It's such an exhausted argument, Harper can't do anything without being immediately compared to some republican evildoer.

    I agree with the title being idiotic though. Couldn't resist a completely random jab against Americans?

    Reply

  • Reddithetic

    Reddithetic

    March 10, 2015, 10:13 pm

    You really are not very bright. When you can marry and have children, you will create a financial boon for your state, and your state will encourage the practice.

    The state can render all marriages null and void tomorrow if it wants to. It also has no need to cater to your very poor attempt at logic.

    What I said is historical fact- what you said is a dumb sonofabitch that has not reviewed the topic.

    **The only argument gays can make is about their rate of taxation. They have no right to marriage guaranteed by the constitution, but taxing married couples differently could be argued as unconstitutional.** There is no right to have the state acknowledge your marriage. None. There is only references to taxation practices with the general idea being no taxation without representation.

    At this time, there are several federal agencies that are wildly unconstitutional, along with the lobbying attention given to corporate interest, in addition to a long list of taxes that are unconstitutional, most specifically the income tax. These are real issues- with real harm being created, to all citizens.

    Our government is so glad you are all so fucking stupid you will make getting married to a man more important than any of those.. divide and conquer.. using your very poor reasoning as a tool. Tool.

    Reply

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